Announcements


1. ) Student evaluations can be administered starting Mon 11/13
      • Evaluations should be administered by mentors, accept in extraordinary circumstances;
      • No one is allowed to administer their own evaluations
      • Usually, evaluations are administered near the beginning or end of class
      • Consult with your mentor, but you will probably bring the envelope and pencils to the classroom for him/her.
2. ) Please insure two, signed observations are in your file in the department office.
3.) From the Writing Center: "Please remind your mentees that we are approaching crunch-time in the writing center, and so it's a good idea to tell students to leave enough time to meet with a tutor before their paper is due. Our hours, locations, and other information are on our website: https://www.iup.edu/writingcenter/
4.) Other announcements . . . . ?
Plagiarism Protocol

Response to Student Writing / (Writers)

As writing teachers, an important way we guide students toward becoming stronger writers is through the feedback we give on student writing. We typically provide our responses through: 1) marginal comments; 2) summary comments; 3) one-to-one conferences. In this mentoring session, we'll discuss and practice strategies for leaving written comments as well as some of the less effective habits about which we should be wary.

For the sake of discussion, let's assume we're leaving comments on a draft or a piece of writing which may be revised later in the semester for portfolio; in other words, it is NOT a final piece of writing.

Scan Your Own Practice

1.) What are your goals in leaving marginal comments?
2.) What should a good final comment accomplish?
3.) What other feedback mechanisms do you use (ex. a checklist)?
4.) What is most difficult about providing feedback on student writing?
5.) What are some of the pitfalls (ineffective commenting patterns) into which you may have fallen from time to time?

Sample Writing


References
  • Tips/Selections from some useful references:

  • A short essay by Paul Corrigan in which he advises less attention be paid to Student Errors.
  • Sommers, Nancy. Responding to Student Writers. Boston: Bedfort/St. Martins, 2014. PDF