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Tuesday, September 26

  1. page Announcements edited = = National Day of Writing Oct 20, 2017 ... ambitious undertaking). In the CHSS buil…

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    National Day of Writing Oct 20, 2017
    ...
    ambitious undertaking).
    In the CHSS building lobby, we will host a Writing Carnival (complete with popcorn, cotton candy - and **Cirque du Papier artist, Michael Roy**), from about 11am-1pm. Broadly construed, we envision tables around the lobby, each representing communities of writers on campus - publications, courses, writing groups, etc. Each table will be given free reign to design its own carnival fun - a game, a “sideshow," a presentation of some kind -- anything that would engage passer-bys with writing.
    Your students could get involved by creating and then staffing a class table as part of or as an entire class project. Perhaps you could offer this option as an extra credit opportunity. We’d love to see English majors and minors involved in creating the event, not just walking through it. Of course, there’s opportunity for LSE students to develop creative ideas as part of their courses - to encourage students in required writing courses to see writing as fun and joyful. If you can’t work it into your class as a project and you are teaching during that time, we hope you'll bring your students down for a few minutes so they can browse the carnival.
    We had 18 groups planning tables last year - only one of them was a proposal from an English department course. We can do better than that!!
    ...
    September 30th.
    I’m

    I’m
    happy to
    ...
    brainstorm ideas.
    Hope to see you there!
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    9:47 am
  2. page Announcements edited = = National Day of Writing Oct 20, 2017 The Jones White Writing Center and the Writing Acro…

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    National Day of Writing Oct 20, 2017
    The Jones White Writing Center and the Writing Across the Curriculum program will host the annual IUP celebration of the National Day on Writing. In the past, we’ve done a open-mic coffeehouse reading, a tweet-athon, a hand-written notes writing event, and an Instagram contest. This year’s event will be the most ambitious ever (you may recall last year’s event was cancelled due to an even more ambitious undertaking).
    In the CHSS building lobby, we will host a Writing Carnival (complete with popcorn, cotton candy - and **Cirque du Papier artist, Michael Roy**), from about 11am-1pm. Broadly construed, we envision tables around the lobby, each representing communities of writers on campus - publications, courses, writing groups, etc. Each table will be given free reign to design its own carnival fun - a game, a “sideshow," a presentation of some kind -- anything that would engage passer-bys with writing.
    Your students could get involved by creating and then staffing a class table as part of or as an entire class project. Perhaps you could offer this option as an extra credit opportunity. We’d love to see English majors and minors involved in creating the event, not just walking through it. Of course, there’s opportunity for LSE students to develop creative ideas as part of their courses - to encourage students in required writing courses to see writing as fun and joyful. If you can’t work it into your class as a project and you are teaching during that time, we hope you'll bring your students down for a few minutes so they can browse the carnival.
    We had 18 groups planning tables last year - only one of them was a proposal from an English department course. We can do better than that!!
    If you or your students are interested in hosting a table or space, please complete this form by September 30th.
    I’m happy to answer questions or brainstorm ideas.
    Hope to see you there!

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    9:46 am
  3. page home edited IUP-LIT-CRIT-MENTORING.WIKISPACES.COM Announcements Fall 2017 [[include component="page…

    IUP-LIT-CRIT-MENTORING.WIKISPACES.COM
    Announcements
    Fall 2017
    [[include component="page" wikiName="iup-lit-crit-mentoring" page="Fall 2017" editable="1" wrap="1"]]
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    9:44 am
  4. page Teaching paragraph organization edited ... Students are organized into groups. Each group is given a paragraph (either pre-written, or dr…
    ...
    Students are organized into groups. Each group is given a paragraph (either pre-written, or drawn from a previous class' work). Students are then responsible for highlighting or otherwise indicating the order of importance to the paragraph of each sentence. Once done, students get a good, graphical image of "how important is this sentence." Without general consensus, a topic sentence has not been clearly indicated.
    If the students agree on a sentence that they think is important, we then move to finding the proper place for it.
    It sometimes helps to design in-class activities as a game. Individuals instantly feel as if they have agency in gaming scenarios (at least, in well-designed games); therefore, any particular in-class activity, no matter the aim or goal, results in active learning.
    An example of a paragraph-structured game such as this involves is one we discussed called "topic telephone." A student is asked for a topic ("Name a noun"); this student picks another student, who must write a topic sentence for the paragraph related to that topic. That student then picks and new topic and sends it on. This can be expanded to include transition sentences, or to write entire paragraphs in groups, rather than sentences alone.

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  5. page Teaching paragraph organization edited Active Learning Students are organized into groups. Each group is given a paragraph (either pre-w…
    Active Learning
    Students are organized into groups. Each group is given a paragraph (either pre-written, or drawn from a previous class' work). Students are then responsible for highlighting or otherwise indicating the order of importance to the paragraph of each sentence. Once done, students get a good, graphical image of "how important is this sentence." Without general consensus, a topic sentence has not been clearly indicated.
    If the students agree on a sentence that they think is important, we then move to finding the proper place for it.

    (view changes)
  6. page Critical source evaluation edited Scenario: Engl 202. Students have submitted a short essay; they are preparing proposals, including …
    Scenario: Engl 202. Students have submitted a short essay; they are preparing proposals, including an annotated bibliography. You would like them to have a more confident sense of how to independently evaluate the reliability and suitability of a source (beyond just relying on its being "peer reviewed").
    ...
    we discussed: encouraging
    Encouraging
    students to
    ...
    working knowledge, etc.); consideringetc.)
    Considering
    expertise and
    ...
    has to say?); evaluatingsay?)
    Evaluating
    sources by modeling careful annotations; utilizingannotations
    Utilizing
    the CRAAP
    ...
    depending length)
    As an introduction to the activity at the end of class one: Ask students what they have expertise in and ask them to reflect on what it feels like when they encounter ignorance within that field.
    As homework on a discussion board: Then ask them to move online and identify a story that they think is suspicious in its claims ('fake news' stories that abound on social media), and ask them to research in order to fact-check this story and/or have them use the CRAAP test to evaluate the validity and expertise of the article.
    During class two: Lastly, have a class discussion (using their stories as texts) about what our responsibility is to confront misinformation, both online and in our writing.
    ...
    to believe this...)this...") and have
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    7:26 am
  7. page Responsive reading edited Active Learning Learning: Responsive Reading Rationale: This lesson is trying to enable student…
    Active LearningLearning: Responsive Reading
    Rationale:
    This lesson is trying to enable students with the ability to engage with a text at a level beyond the surface knowledge of plot, character, etc. The students will be empowered to formulate their own opinions and questions concerning a reading.
    Students have a reading from an anthology and this lesson will ask them to formulate three questions concerning the reading. Students will break into 10 groups of 4-5 students.
    The student groups will formulate:
    1) A Literal question
    2) An Interpretive question
    3) An Application question
    Then the groups will be asked to share their questions with the class as a whole and we will all try to answer the group questions.
    Other ideas:
    Peer discussion leaders (either group or individual).
    Model what close reading is and what comes from it.
    Display a section of text and have the students close read it as a large group looking for word choice and figurative language.
    Allow the students to pick quotes they enjoy, write them down and then write why they feel a certain way.

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  8. page Critical source evaluation edited Active Learning Scenario: Engl 202. Students have submitted a short essay; they are preparing pro…
    Active LearningScenario: Engl 202. Students have submitted a short essay; they are preparing proposals, including an annotated bibliography. You would like them to have a more confident sense of how to independently evaluate the reliability and suitability of a source (beyond just relying on its being "peer reviewed").
    Things we discussed: encouraging students to start their inquiry projects in the popular realm, but then understand how to move into the academic realm (using bibliographies, develop a working knowledge, etc.); considering expertise and time spent on a question (is the opinion you form off the cuff equal to someone who has spent decades in the field? If you break your leg, do you go to see a doctor or see what your next door neighbor has to say?); evaluating sources by modeling careful annotations; utilizing the CRAAP Test, particularly for online sources (Currency, Relevancy, Authority, Accuracy, and Purpose).
    Lesson Plan: (for 2-3 classes depending length)
    As an introduction to the activity at the end of class one: Ask students what they have expertise in and ask them to reflect on what it feels like when they encounter ignorance within that field.
    As homework on a discussion board: Then ask them to move online and identify a story that they think is suspicious in its claims ('fake news' stories that abound on social media), and ask them to research in order to fact-check this story and/or have them use the CRAAP test to evaluate the validity and expertise of the article.
    During class two: Lastly, have a class discussion (using their stories as texts) about what our responsibility is to confront misinformation, both online and in our writing.
    As a follow up activity: Have students read an article on confirmation bias (The Oatmeal has a simple comic that starts with "You're not going to believe this...) and have them reflect on what it feels like to confront our own biases or have dissonance created with our core beliefs as a way of flipping the moral responsibility question that we explored with online sources discussed previously (and creating empathy within a discussion).

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    7:23 am
  9. page Source integration edited ... Quoting in context -- in groups, but quotes out of context -- try to manipulate meaning, so th…
    ...
    Quoting in context -- in groups, but quotes out of context -- try to manipulate meaning, so they can see how out of context it makes an opposing point
    Developing research questions
    Cutting up paragraphs in puzzle form -- other groups have to reassemble -- what do we notice? Does it work the way you want?
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  10. page Source integration edited Active Learning for Source Integration in Eng 101 Use models to show them entry phrases Have stu…
    Active Learning for Source Integration in Eng 101
    Use models to show them entry phrases
    Have students explain parts of paragraphs
    Highlight with different colors to identify different parts of paragraph
    SEXY paragraphs (S - topic sentence, E - examples, X - explain, Y - why does it matter?) -- how to set-up a paragraph and have them identify different parts of paragraph
    Take a citation from a book and respond to it -- do you agree/disagree? Why? -- speaking back to the text (What do you think about this citation?)
    Annotating texts making marginal notes with questions
    Informal peer review -- bring two paragraphs; talk about what you're doing, what are you not understanding?
    Bring in quotes -- add own wording around it
    Quoting in context -- in groups, but quotes out of context -- try to manipulate meaning, so they can see how out of context it makes an opposing point
    Developing research questions

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